Ativan Addiction

Ativan Addiction

Ativan Addiction

When taking  Ativan or any over the counter drug, whether it be recreational or prescription, it is important to understand the risks involved and addiction is one. Especially with Ativan, which like many recreational pain medications, has become a favorite among those seeking a cheap form of pain relief. While the possibility of Ativan addiction is real, particularly when taken improperly and in conjunction with other drugs, the possibility of addiction is also greatly enhanced when used recreationally and/or improperly. If left unchecked, Ativan addictions can easily spin out of control, completely destroying ones personal, social and financial well-being. Ativan, also known as Klonopin, is a prescription strength benzodiazepine that is used for the treatment of anxiety disorders, such as panic attacks and obsessive compulsive disorders. The major metabolite of Ativan is diazepam, and its half life is relatively short, therefore it is usually prescribed in short term treatment to manage short term symptoms of an anxiety disorder. Ativan is usually prescribed to be used in conjunction with alcohol, in order to help relieve the patient’s symptoms and provide temporary relief from the alcohol. It is however advised to avoid long term use of Ativan, because it is highly addictive in nature and puts the patient at great risk for misuse and addiction. It is highly recommended that patients who are considering using Ativan, be well versed on the side effects and dangers of this prescription drug, and be sure to discuss the options with your physician beforehand. As Ativan is a commonly prescribed drug for the treatment of anxiety disorders and can be purchased without a prescription, it is important that one stay aware of the possible complications and risks of overuse and abuse.

Ativan is also often prescribed in conjunction with lorazepam, in order to treat the symptoms of insomnia. However, misuse or addiction to lorazepam can cause a strong withdrawal symptom when stopped abruptly. The abuse of lorazepam buy Ativan addicts is widespread and reported, especially on the social networks, such as Facebook, where people come together in groups to discuss current events, or their personal problems. On these social networks, Ativan addicts will often “friends” other users who have become addicted to Ativan, forming virtual communities of Ativan addicts where they exchange tales of how they managed to kick Ativan into rehab, or share where they are now living. While it may seem ironic that a highly advertised benzodiazepine would end up being abused so intensely, it is no surprise that the effects of lorazepam addiction could mirror those of Ativan. There have been no formal studies linking Ativan addiction to the changes in a person’s brain chemistry that occur when taking lorazepam. However, it has been noted by users and family members that after long periods of taking the drug, a certain level of changes in perception and mental alertness occurs, resulting in the drug becoming almost addictive in some cases. The Ativan user may feel less irritable or have increased reactions to situations than they did before taking the drug. Some even say that they have an almost “glassy” feeling when taking the drug, a feeling of detachment from the situation that they are in.

Many users also report feelings of nausea and vomiting whenever they take lorazepam, or take another strong prescription drug, such as phenobarbital, which is commonly used for anxiety or panic disorders. For this reason, many people who suffer from Ativan addiction do not take the 1 mg pill from the beginning, but begin taking it much too frequently, eventually getting behind the dosage wall and entering a full blown Ativan relapse. The psychological effects of the drug can quickly get out of hand, causing mental health problems for the patient and family members who are trying to help them. For this reason, ativan addiction should be treated by treating the underlying prescription medication, if possible. Ativan addiction, like other prescription drug addictions, can be treated with counseling and drug treatment, in most cases. If it is an addiction to lorazepam, which is a relatively new drug, treatment should start with the prescribing practitioner, who can simply cut down the daily dose or adjust the amount of medication. In cases of Ativan addiction, however, it may be necessary to try different medications until relief is found, since ativan addiction has been linked to taking the drug in very large doses for long periods of time. When using benzodiazepines for anxiety or panic disorders, it is imperative that medical intervention is sought as soon as possible, since these symptoms can lead to long-term health problems, including liver damage and heart failure. For these reasons, any contact with ativan should be avoided, even if the symptoms seem to be gone.

 

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